News

 


 

Polluted Paradise: The 28th Environmental Art Festival - Paradise Garden - Polour- Iran

 

 

Painted Earth Goddesses: Some Thousands Years Continuation of Tradition

 

 

Pleasure of New life

 

Bicycle Art & Recycle Art

 

Journey Across Russia: Swimming Against the Tides

 

 

Environmental Art Festivals

 

Work by Ahmad Nadalian @ Environmental Art Calender 2009 in USA

 

Paintings by Coloured Earth

=

The Fall of Paradise: 19th Environmental Art Festival in Iran - Isfahan :  (October 2008)  

 

Journey across South Africa: The Sprit of Rocks and Water

 

Black & White People

 

Sand Print in Africa

 

Freed Fish

 

Art in the Landscape

Marked in Stone and Sand

An Iranian sculptor brings his art to the river, beaches—and parks.

By Robert C. Morgan

 

Nadalian @ Dialogues in Diversity  

 

Nadalian is an Iranian sculptor whose life's work involves engendering respect for living creatures and the natural environment. To achieve this, besides living with nature himself, he established sculpture grounds in a peaceful environment in natural surroundings. Water is a living element that contributes to his sculptures, and many of the symbols he engraves and sculpts are derived from ancient mythology and the rituals of pre-Islamic civilizations.

By John K. Grande

 

By : Edward Lucie-Smith
 

In Iran, Ahmad Nadalian (b.1963) is in the process of creating an immense River Art installation along the banks and amidst the waters of the Haraz River, near Mount Damavend More



Art Tomorrow

"works by Nadalian  being the most advanced of its kind, especially the way in which you use the internet". Edward Lucie-Smith 14 Nov 2002   lecture at the British Museum.

 

 

 

Utne Magazine May-June 2006  USA

Ahmad Nadalian
[Iran]

A human who loves stones and water, Ahmad Nadalian moves like a fish transgressing international borders. Nadalian  has traveled widely, leaving graphic messages on all continents but Antarctica in the form of etched stones ...
 More

 

UNDER THE DOME OF TIME:
Two Iranian Sculptors

By Professor  Robert C. Morgan
 

The concept of permanence in sculpture is almost a subliminal aspect of Persian culture.  It is a culture that virtually defines meaning in art according to how long the work will last.  Then again, for artists like Behrooz Daresh and Ahmad Nadalian, the idea of permanence as a criterion in art is clearly beginning to change.  They are interested in a more conceptual approach, and, to some extent, a more implicitly political approach.   More

Sculpture Magazine (Vol. 27, No. 2) March 2008

 

Nadalian: River Art

An interview by John K. GRANDE

Nadalian is an Iranian sculptor whose life's work involves engendering respect for living creatures and the natural environment. To achieve this, besides living with nature himself, he established sculpture grounds in a peaceful environment in natural surroundings. Water is a living element that contributes to his sculptures, and many of the symbols he engraves and sculpts are derived from ancient mythology and the rituals of pre-Islamic civilizations. more

 

Nadalian in Green Museum

By carving simple fish shapes and other forms onto small stones and river rocks, artist Ahmad Nadalian seeks to repopulate the spirit of neglected streams and rivers in his native Iran and around the world and share these treasures with future generations ... Over the past decade the artist has frequently traveled to cities and remote regions and locations in every continent to work with children and local residents to create countless treasures ...  more

 

Sand Prints

 

Works in China

 

New works by Nadalian in “Verdearte” 2006:  Italy

 

Works in USA

 

A Journey to Serbia

 

Mythological Treasures or Contemporary Art

 

Works in Tajikistan

 

Works in Iran

 

Works in UK

 

Works  in France

 

Works  in Spain

 

 The fundamental concern of this artist is the search for harmony with nature, with ourselves, and the universe which surrounds us (Eva Shakouri Torreadrado).

 

Sand Prints

 

Works In Germany

 

Works  in Turkey


 

Works in Paris

 

Click Here to Download larger size Images

 




Nests

 

Hidden Treasures: An Art Exhibition for next Millenniums  Persian

 

Tess Corino 2003

The fish in Ahmad Nadalian’s childhood river have been killed by pollution. He carves their images on rocks and puts them back, along with crabs, snakes, goddesses. He doesn’t disclose their location. His art consists in a nourishing of the river, but he records his work and it is available online.

Anahita: The Goddess of Fertility

 

Works in Bangladesh

 

Accident and Improvisation: Works on Wali Asr Street, Tehran

 

 

The Death of Fish:  The River No Longer Has any Fish


The story began when a painter returned to his homeland after years of living abroad, having finished his studies and received a doctorate degree, and was in search of his lost paradise.  He had returned to the land of his forefathers, seeking a peaceful life, far away from the troubles of the city.

 

Nadalian: River Art

An interview by John K. GRANDE

Nadalian is an Iranian sculptor whose life's work involves engendering respect for living creatures and the natural environment. To achieve this, besides living with nature himself, he established sculpture grounds in a peaceful environment in natural surroundings. Water is a living element that contributes to his sculptures, and many of the symbols he engraves and sculpts are derived from ancient mythology and the rituals of pre-Islamic civilizations. more

 

Nadalian in Green Museum

By carving simple fish shapes and other forms onto small stones and river rocks, artist Ahmad Nadalian seeks to repopulate the spirit of neglected streams and rivers in his native Iran and around the world and share these treasures with future generations.  more

 

 

About Ahmad Nadalian

By : Edward Lucie-Smith
 

In Iran, Ahmad Nadalian (b.1963) is in the process of creating an immense River Art installation along the banks and amidst the waters of the Haraz River, near Mount Damavend More

 

 

 

 


 

The Death of Goddess  and Fish

 

I was in search of my lost paradise. I wished to spend time surrounded by nature and living with nature. Upon my return to the land of my forefather I found that my paradise no longer existed. The wellspring was polluted and river no longer had fish. The rivers are sown and the meadows are planted with villas.  Factories are constructed on riverbeds and roads are built… 

 I have created hundreds goddesses and fish on the stones of the river and have dedicated them to nature.  I wanted to build his own paradise.   I liked to believe that these fish are alive, and were swimming against the tides.  My most beautiful moments were when I sat watching the turbulent water of the river, and the frolic of my imaginary fish. The darkest moments were when I witnessed the death of the fish.  I saw his my buried time and again. Due to a lack of respect, these figures have historically been ignored and distorted. I reproduce my destroyed works, and for me, they are metaphors for nature and the life of living creatures who endure pain, suffering, and are destroyed by the evils of our time.

I have taken refuge in the deep ravines where I can overcome evil. There is a temple where I am at peace to worship water. I am not tired. I am determined as ever to build my paradise.

 

 

In many case the riverbed transformed into a road and  as can be seen, many artworks (fish designs) were buried by construction work on the riverbed.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

This is unfair battle. I only use a hammer and chisel which is made by the recycling of a machine's peace. But those who do not respect nature use huge machines and so they destroy nature and my art-works very quickly. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 The death of my Goddess

 

 

 

 

 

One may ask why I perform or install my artwork in these locations?  In many occasions the lovers of nature asked me to do so.  I believe that environmental art can be a solution for protection of nature and cultural heritage.   

 

 

 

The survival of my artworks depend on the survival of nature.  I was aware that these works would eventually be destroyed, but if those who by ignoring nature, destroy it, then I have good reason to shout this fact.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

One of my students assisted me to depict her shadow and then I carved a goddess 

 

 

Recently I finished this goddess 

 

My wife and my goddess
 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Who can love my wounded goddess?