News
 

 

   

PARADISE ART CENTRE

International Residency Program, Education Center and Gallery for Environmental Art

 

 

Journey Under the Sea - Works by Ahmad Nadalian in Syprus

 

 

The immortal mountain and pure water :  A Journey to China

 

 

Art works in China

 

 

Journey across South Africa: The Sprit of Rocks and Water

 

 

Works in USA

 

 

New works by Nadalian in Verdearte 2006:  Italy

 

 

Works In Italy

 

 

Works in China

 

Red People - Kansas City Missouri

 

Carved Stones in New York

 

Carved Stones in Santa Fe (New Mexico)

 

Holiness of Image Hidden Treasure in  Santa Fe (New Mexico)

 

Environmental Works by  Ahmad Nadalian in UK

'

Environmental Works by  Ahmad Nadalian in Turkey

 

Works in Iran

 

 

Works  in Spain

 

 

Works In Germany

 

A Journey to Serbia

 


Travel to France : Exhibition & Works by Nadalian in Ramatuelle- Golfe de Saint Tropez in France  (From Escalet to Pampelonne)

  

 

Works in Tajikistan

 

Works in Bangladesh

 

 

Works by Nadalian in Uzbekistan

 

 

Journey across South Africa: The Sprit of Rocks and Water

 

Calendar of our journey in South Africa

 

Black & White People

 

Sand Print in Africa

 

 

 

Journey across South Africa: The Sprit of Rocks and Water

 

 

 

Journey across South Africa: The Sprit of Rocks and Water

 

Black & White People

 

Sand Print in Africa

 

Freed Fish

 

 

Direct Dialogue of two Iranian and American artists for Peace

 

 

The death of goddesses

 

 



"The Bird of Peace

 

 

Accident and Improvisation: Works on Wali Asr Street, Tehran

 

 

The Guests of Desert: 22nd Environmental Art Festival in Iran - Isfahan- Talab Gawkhoni: (April 2009)

 

 

Dialogue with Nature: 21st Environmental Art Festival in Iran - Persian Gulf- Genaveh: (March 2009)

 

 

Mythological Bird: 20th Environmental Art Festival in Iran - Persian Gulf- Hormoz :  (February 2009)  

 

 

Sand Print in Africa

 

 

In the Search of Lost Paradise

 

 

The immortal mountain and pure water :  A Journey to China

 

Art works in China

 

 

Journey across South Africa: The Sprit of Rocks and Water

 

 

Works in USA

 

 

New works by Nadalian in Verdearte 2006:  Italy

 

 

Works In Italy

 

 

Works in China

 

Red People - Kansas City Missouri

 

Carved Stones in New York

 

Carved Stones in Santa Fe (New Mexico)

 

Holiness of Image Hidden Treasure in  Santa Fe (New Mexico)

 

 

The immortal mountain and pure water :  A Journey to China

 

Art works in China

 

 

Journey across South Africa: The Sprit of Rocks and Water

 

 

Works in USA

 

 

New works by Nadalian in Verdearte 2006:  Italy

 

 

Works In Italy

 

 

Nuclear Worries-   Environmental Art Works in Japan

 

 

A World-Citizen is seeding Symbols

Sibylle Zerr

 

German Text

Ein Weltbrger streut Symbole
Sibylle Zerr

 

 

 

Journey Under the Sea - Works by Ahmad Nadalian in Syprus

 

 

 

Playing With Water:  Journeys Across Hungary, Slovakia, Austria and Turkey

 

 

Journeys To Slovakia

 

A Journeys to Austria

 

 

Environmental Works by  Ahmad Nadalian in Turkey

 

A Journey to South Korea with the Bicycle of Peace

 

Art works in South Korea

Call for International Environmental Art Festival

 

The immortal mountain and pure water :  A Journey to China

 

Art works in China

 

Journey Across Russia: Swimming Against the Tides

 

Local Arts in Hormoz Island

 

My Art works in Hormoz Island

 

Fire: 23ed Environmental Art Festival in Iran - Paradise Environmental Art Center

 

The Guests of Desert: 22nd Environmental Art Festival in Iran - Isfahan- Talab Gawkhoni: (April 2009)

 

 

Dialogue with Nature: 21st Environmental Art Festival in Iran - Persian Gulf- Genaveh: (March 2009)

 

 

Works by Ahmad Nadalian in Darabad - North Tehran

 

 

In the Search of Lost Paradise

 

 

Environmental Art Festivals

 

Bicycle Art & Recycle Art

 

Mythological Bird: 20th Environmental Art Festival in Iran - Persian Gulf- Hormoz :  (February 2009)  

 

Archetypal story: Earth painting

 

 A gift of Persian Gulf from me to people and from people to tourists

 

 

Red earth surrounded my soul

 

Transformation of ugliness to beauty

 

A ritual for rain  & feet traces

 

 

Work by Ahmad Nadalian @ Environmental Art Calender 2009 in USA

 

Jumping Frogs

 

Journey across South Africa: The Sprit of Rocks and Water

 

Calendar of our journey in South Africa

 

Black & White People

 

Sand Print in Africa

 

Freed Fish

 

Paradise & Hell :18th Environmental Art Festival

 

 

Art in the Landscape

Marked in Stone and Sand

An Iranian sculptor brings his art to the river, beachesand parks.

By Robert C. Morgan

 

In Paradise

 

Pleasure of New life

 

Art in the Landscape

Marked in Stone and Sand

An Iranian sculptor brings his art to the river, beachesand parks.

By Robert C. Morgan

 

Direct Dialogue of two Iranian and American artists for Peace

 

 

Green People

 



"The Bird of Peace

 




Nests for Birds  

ی ی ی ی !

 

 

Nadalian @ Dialogues in Diversity  

By John K. Grande

 

Print on Sanin in Maranjab Desert

 

Black & White People

 

Sand Print in Africa

 

Freed Fish

 

Design of fish-  Sea of Salt

 

A Journey to Serbia

 

New Borders

 

Seduced Couple

Works in China

 

Report: Kerman Environmental Art Festival

 

Prehistoric Fish Found in Central Park

Thursday, May 24, 2007

Abigail Doan 

A week or so ago my Iranian artist friend, Dr. Ahmad Nadalian, visited New York City and several other US cities on an official invite for a sponsored exhibition that he was having in Washington, D.C. I met him on a bright, sunny morning in the northern woods of Central Park where he was carving several of his 'prehistoric' river art fishes. Dr. Nadalian has a long tradition of submerging his carved rocks in rivers and bodies of water where they might forever add to the spirit and environmental protection of the place. The artist also views the fish symbol as being emblematic of the human soul.



Amazingly, before tossing one of his carved rocks into a pool below a rushing waterfall, a local turtle made an appearance adjacent to the rock that was soon to be submerged. A sign perhaps that the native species of an urban park approve of this new addition to their habitat?

See More at :

http://abigaildoan.blogspot.com

 

Works in Rock Creek River- Washington DC

 

Works in Tajikistan

 

The image has significant meaning for Native Americans in that it is a vessel for the spirit and holiness of peoples and place.  A constant reminder also that "No one should harm or disrespect their sacred burial ground".

 

Red People - Kansas City Missouri

 

Carved Stones in New York

 

Carved Stones in Santa Fe (New Mexico)

 

Holiness of Image Hidden Treasure in  Santa Fe (New Mexico)

 

Environmental Works by  Ahmad Nadalian in UK

'

Environmental Works by  Ahmad Nadalian in Turkey

 

Click and download large Images


 

Journey across South Africa: The Sprit of Rocks and Water

 

Calendar of our journey in South Africa

 

Black & White People

 

Sand Print in Africa

 

Freed Fish

 

Travel to France : Exhibition & Works by Nadalian in Ramatuelle- Golfe de Saint Tropez in France  (From Escalet to Pampelonne)

  

 

Playing With Water:  Journeys Across Hungary, Slovakia, Austria and Turkey

 

 

Journeys To Slovakia

 

A Journeys to Austria

 

 

Environmental Works by  Ahmad Nadalian in Turkey

 

Playing With Water:  Journeys Across Hungary, Slovakia, Austria and Turkey

 

 

Journeys To Slovakia

 

A Journeys to Austria

 

 

Environmental Works by  Ahmad Nadalian in Turkey

 

 

Playing With Water:  Journeys Across Hungary, Slovakia, Austria and Turkey

 

 

Journeys To Slovakia

 

A Journeys to Austria

 

 

Environmental Works by  Ahmad Nadalian in Turkey

 

Works In Germany

 

 

 

 


Nuclear Worries-   Environmental Art Works in Japan

Ahmad Nadalian

 

In October 2012 I traveled to the "Land of the Rising Sun" Japan and presented my environmental art works in Tokyo and eastern cost of Japan.

 

 

 

My journey to Japan occurred  because of the efforts of Sadegh Miri and kindness of Solymanieh's family, who invited me and also connected me to the local artists. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The first night I stayed in Tokyo, but Amir (Soleymanieh) took me to Oiso in the Eastern coast of Japan the next day.

 

 

 

 

 

In Oiso we visited some artists in the house of Yasuola Haruhiko. He and his wife, Yasuda Silvia Miniopaluello, are  known Japanese artists.

 

 

 

 

 

Then we went to the Cape Manazuru which is located in the south part of Kanagawa prefecture. It has excellent view of ocean. 

This is a formation of three rocks extending about 200m out into the ocean off the point of Cape Manazuru.

 

 

 

Manazuru  rock

 

The shape is similar to a "Kasa (umbrella)"and the formation is also known as Kasajima Island. At low tide, you can walk out to the rocks.  There I search for stones and realize some art works.   The forest has many old pine trees which, some of them, are over 300 years old. Near this location, we can see Yugahara and Atami where there are great hot springs.  Manazuru town is also well known as fish market.

 

The day after Nishimura Hiroyuki and Kayoko took me to the mountain and we explored the nature.

 

 

 

I saw Foji mountain and this Japanese icon is very similar to Damavand Mountain in Iran but Damavand is much bigger.

 

 

When I came back home I saw Damavand again.  

 

 

 We went by a river named Niizaki.  In extension of a long project, I carved some fish. 

 

My fish in Niizaki river

 

 

 I also dropped some fish into the Niizaki river

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

After my performance we went to Kusu-Kusu gallery

We had lunch with Nakayama Keiko and Taijro

 

 

 

In the gallery I saw a Shirt showing danger of nuclear power

 

 

 

The atomic bombings of the cities of Hiroshima and Nagasaki in Japan were conducted by the United States during the final stages of World War II in 1945. The two events are the only use of nuclear weapons in war to date.

Following a firebombing campaign that destroyed many Japanese cities, the Allies prepared for a costly invasion of Japan. The war in Europe ended when Nazi Germany signed its instrument of surrender on 8 May, but the Pacific War continued. Together with the United Kingdom and the Republic of China, the United States called for a surrender of Japan in the Potsdam Declaration on 26 July 1945, threatening Japan with "prompt and utter destruction". The Japanese government ignored this ultimatum. American airmen dropped Little Boy on the city of Hiroshima on 6 August 1945, followed by Fat Man over Nagasaki on 9 August.

 

 

 

Within the first two to four months of the bombings, the acute effects killed 90,000166,000 people in Hiroshima and 60,00080,000 in Nagasaki, with roughly half of the deaths in each city occurring on the first day. The Hiroshima prefecture health department estimated that, of the people who died on the day of the explosion, 60% died from flash or flame burns, 30% from falling debris and 10% from other causes. During the following months, large numbers died from the effect of burns, radiation sickness, and other injuries, compounded by illness. In a US estimate of the total immediate and short term cause of death, 1520% died from radiation sickness, 2030% from burns, and 5060% from other injuries, compounded by illness. In both cities, most of the dead were civilians, although Hiroshima had a sizeable garrison.

On 15 August, six days after the bombing of Nagasaki, Japan announced its surrender to the Allies, signing the Instrument of Surrender on 2 September, officially ending World War II. The bombings led, in part, to post-war Japan's adopting Three Non-Nuclear Principles, forbidding the nation from nuclear armament. The role of the bombings in Japan's surrender and their ethical justification are still debated.

 

 

In one of my cylinder seal I used words of "No Nuclear" in both Japanese and English languages.

 

 

 The other print of cylinder seal were images of cranes 

 

Cranes in Japanese textiles generally represent longevity and good fortune. They are most closely associated with Japanese New Year and wedding ceremonies for example the crane is often woven into a wedding kimono or obi.   Out of the many shapes, animals and works of art created by origami (Japanese paper folding), the crane is produced most often. It is customary within Japanese culture to fold one thousand paper cranes when making a special wish. Giant colourful necklaces of cranes are a common sight outside Japanese shrines and temples.

Sadako Sasaki ( January 7, 1943 October 25, 1955) was a Japanese girl who was two years old when the atomic bomb was dropped on August 6, 1945, near her home by Misasa Bridge in Hiroshima, Japan. Sadako is remembered through the story of a thousand origami cranes before her death, and is to this day a symbol of innocent victims of war.

For those in the Western world, one thousand origami paper cranes have become closely associated with the bombing of Hiroshima by the Allies in 1945 and the wider issue of world peace.

 

 

 

 

After few days I traveled to historic city of Kamakura. The city has a beautiful beach.

 

 

In Kamakura, I stayed in Nui hostel for few days, where different people from Japan and other nationality stayed.

 

 

Akiko Kawaguchi.

 

 In this residential place I meet Akiko Kawaguchi. 

 In this residential place I meet Akiko Kawaguchi.  She had Master of Environmental Management from Yale University and Bachelor of Science - Biology (Dartmouth College) and here current job was Environmental, Health and Safety manager for an American manufacturing company.
 

She has no doubts about the dangers of Fukushima disaster subsequent to the devastating earthquake and it's impact on Japan and it's environment. We are still in touch and she sends me some articles about this subject.

 

Fukushima disaster

 

 

The Fukushima disaster occurred in 2011 after the plant was ravaged by a devastating tsunami following an earthquake.

The radiation effects from the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear disaster are the observed and predicted effects resulting from the release of radioactive isotopes from the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant after the 2011 Tōhoku earthquake and tsunami. Radioactive isotopes were released from reactor containment vessels as a result of venting to reduce gaseous pressure, and the discharge of coolant water into the sea. This resulted in Japanese authorities implementing a 20 km exclusion zone around the power plant, and the continued displacement of approximately 156,000 people as of early 2013. Trace quantities of radioactive particles from the incident, including iodine-131 and caesium-134/137, have since been detected around the world. As of early 2013, no physical health effects due to radiation have been observed among the public or Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant workers.

 

 

 

According to French newspaper Le Monde, Two years after the disaster at the Fukushima Daichi nuclear plant in Japan -- called the "worst accidental release of radiation to the ocean in history" -- a fish with staggering levels of radiation has reportedly been found in the vicinity of the plant.  It reportedly contained more than 2,500 times the legal limit for radiation in seafood.  The find is a stark reminder that fears of radiation continue to haunt the island nation years after the nuclear catastrophe rocked Japan's waters.

The facility's emergency generators were flooded, causing meltdowns in three reactors. As radiation spewed into the surrounding waters and atmosphere, thousands of residents were evacuated and fishing around Fukushima was stopped. At the time, the government reportedly also "banned beef, milk, mushrooms and vegetables from being produced" in the surrounding areas.

Then in October, Buessler and his colleagues revealed that about 40 percent of the fish caught near the nuclear plant was found to be contaminated with radioactive caesium above government safety limits. According to the Guardian, Buesseler warned at the time that Fukushima fish "may be inedible for a decade."

 

In one of my cylinder I carved fish and print it by the beach.

 

 

No Nuclear

 

Peace

 

When I was in Kamakura a Japanese boy and a girl from Switzerland named Luke Abbot joined me and we visited some Buddhist and Shinto temple. 

 

 

There are also many Shinto temple named Zeniarai Benzaiten Ugafuku Jinja Shrine.  Water play an important role in Shinto's ritual. In one of the temple I saw Japanese people wash their money with water.  It is believed that if you spend money that has been washed in the spring water, it will increase many times and come back to you. The water of the spring inside the cave is supposed to have the power to multiply the money it comes in contact with. This unique tradition of coming to wash your coins began in 1257 when Hojo Tokiyori came here and washed his coins with the spring water, expressing the hope that they may be doubled. People heard the story, and the tradition was born.

According to the sign at the entrance, Zeniarai Benzaiten was founded in 1185 (Bunji 1) after Minamoto no Yoritomo (11471199), first of the Kamakura shoguns, on the day of the Snake in the month of the Snake  dreamed of kami Ugafukujin.

He was told: In the valley to the northwest, there is a miraculous spring that gushes out of the rocks. Go there and worship the gods of Shinto, and peace will come to the people.

I am the kami of this land, Ugakufujin." Yoritomo reportedly found the spring and built a shrine for Ugafukujin, a kami whose symbol is a snake with a human head.

 

 

 

 

Usually fish can be seen in pools

 

Installation in Kamakura's beach

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 One day I saw a woman who was throwing flowers to the sea.

 

 

 

 

I decided to drop fish but I still don't know her reason.

 

I also drop fish

 

 

In Kamakura, there is a big statue of Buddha.

 

The Great Buddha of Kamakura (Kamakura Daibutsu) is a bronze statue of Amida Buddha, which stands on the grounds of Kotokuin Temple. With a height of 13.35 meters, it is the second tallest bronze Buddha statue in Japan, surpassed only by the statue in Nara's Todaiji Temple.

The statue was cast in 1252 and originally located inside a large temple hall. However, the temple buildings were destroyed multiple times by typhoons and a tidal wave in the 14th and 15th centuries. So, since 1495, the Buddha has been standing in the open air.

 

 

 

 

 

After few days I come back to Tokyo and stayed in Toco guesthouse

 

 

 

 

In this guesthouse I tested various Japanese foods.

 

 

 

 

In Tokyo I used red earth and draw a snake on the face of Mina Igarashi

 

 

 

After the invitation of Japan― lran Cultural Exchange Association I reviewed my environmental art works.  Erniko Okada , the chairman of the Association was there.

 

 

 

One of the Japanese lady gave a special Japanese food.

 

 

 

 

In Tokyo there is a temple that destroyed during the world war. It was rebuilt after the war. It was not a safe building.

 

 

 

 It has been designed by Kiyoshi Sey Takeyama and reconstructed in 2012.

 

The name of the temple is Iko-in.

The address is:

Taito-ku Kotobuki 2-6-8

台東区寿2-6-8

威光院 Iko-in

 

 

 

 

 

 I added an installation to the building. 

 

 

 

 

 

When it rained

 

 

 

The architect Kiyoshi Sey Takeyama wrote this Japanese text for me;

Dear Mr. Ahmad Nadalian
 Thank you for your wonderful art craft.
 Water is the source of the life.
 Our temple "Ikoin" has become rich by the Fishes that you gave us.
 

 

Kiyoshi Sey Takeyama

 

 

I left a print of piece on clay and left it in the treasure of the temple.

 

 

 

The family of priest

 

 

 

The wife of the priest wrote this letter to me:

 

Dear Mr. Ahmad Nadalian
 Thank you very much for your wonderful art craft.
 We appreciate it from our heart.
 To see the Fish we had a good feeling of life, it seems swimming and moving
 in the water.
 We will cherish it forever.
 We look forward to see you again
 Takahiro & Ritsuko Horii 

 

 

I dropped a fish in the pool of temple.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 In Tokyo I visited few Shinto temples

 

 

People usually perform ritual wash before entering the temple.

 

 

In Toyo I visited Faculty of Art. They practice both Japanese traditional painting and western style.

 

 

In the entrance of the space of painting for traditional art we can see shows.

 

 

I met some artists who practice international style.

 

 In the last day of my stay in Japan I was invited by Mr. Solymaneyeh to eat Sushi.

 

 

In Japan we can see tradition and new life style together.