News

 

Thanks to:   Simon Max Bannister and his family : Adam, Paul and Alison Bannister Kate Grogh, Tasha Weddapohl ...

 

Calendar of our journey in South Africa

 

Black & White People

 

Sand Print in Africa

 

Freed Fish

 

Simon Max Bannister Says: The journey has been a success in all. Ahmad’s mission to spread his fish around the four corners of the Earth is complete. He has left many an everlasting moment in his works around South Africa. I feel he has seen both sides of the communities, from the rich to the poor, city to wilderness, from the ugly to the beautiful. We have touched many people’s lives too and left a strong positive message along the way. Ahmad has been a complete inspiration; I have a resurgence of energy to focus supremely on my art and its message. He has shown me focus and a daring determination in what is his passion and life.

 

Freed Fish

 

 

New Borders

 

Seduced Couple

 

Works in Rock Creek River- Washington DC

 

Red People - Kansas City Missouri

 

Carved Stones in New York

 

Calendar of our journey in South Africa

 

 

Journey across South Africa: The Sprit of Rocks and Water

 

Sand Print in Africa

 

Freed Fish

 

Freed Fish

 

New Borders

 

Seduced Couple

 

Carved Stones in Santa Fe (New Mexico)

 

Holiness of Image Hidden Treasure in  Santa Fe (New Mexico)

 

Environmental Works by  Ahmad Nadalian in UK

 

Journey across South Africa: The Sprit of Rocks and Water

 

Sand Print in Africa

 

Freed Fish

 

Freed Fish

 

New Borders

 

Seduced Couple


 

Works in USA

 

New works by Nadalian in “Verdearte” 2006:  Italy

 

Works in Iran

 

Works in UK

 

Works  in France

 

Works In Germany

 

Utne Magazine May-June 2006  USA

Ahmad Nadalian
[Iran]

A human who loves stones and water, Ahmad Nadalian moves like a fish transgressing international borders.   More

 

Nadalian in Green Museum

By carving simple fish shapes and other forms onto small stones and river rocks, artist Ahmad Nadalian seeks to repopulate the spirit of neglected streams and rivers in his native Iran and around the world and share these treasures with future generations.  more

 

 

Persian Gulf Environmental Art Festival Second section


Environmental Art Festival on the Persian Gulf

 

New Print on Sand in the Coast of Persian Gulf

 

New Carved Rocks in Hormoz Island (Persian Gulf)  March 2007

 

 

Works in USA

 

New works by Nadalian in “Verdearte” 2006:  Italy

 

Works in Iran

 

Works in UK

 

Works  in France

 

Works In Germany

 

Works  in Turkey

 

Works in Rock Creek River- Washington DC

 

Red People - Kansas City Missouri

 

Carved Stones in New York

 

Carved Stones in Santa Fe (New Mexico)

 

 

Works in Rock Creek River- Washington DC

 

Red People - Kansas City Missouri

 

Carved Stones in New York

 

Carved Stones in Santa Fe (New Mexico)

 

Holiness of Image Hidden Treasure in  Santa Fe (New Mexico)

 

Environmental Works by  Ahmad Nadalian in UK

 

Prehistoric Fish Found in Central Park

Thursday, May 24, 2007

Abigail Doan

A week or so ago my Iranian artist friend, Dr. Ahmad Nadalian, visited New York City and several other US cities on an official invite for a sponsored exhibition that he was having in Washington, D.C. I met him on a bright, sunny morning in the northern woods of Central Park where he was carving several of his 'prehistoric' river art fishes. Dr. Nadalian has a long tradition of submerging his carved rocks in rivers and bodies of water where they might forever add to the spirit and environmental protection of the place. The artist also views the fish symbol as being emblematic of the human soul.



Amazingly, before tossing one of his carved rocks into a pool below a rushing waterfall, a local turtle made an appearance adjacent to the rock that was soon to be submerged. A sign perhaps that the native species of an urban park approve of this new addition to their habitat?

See More at :

http://abigaildoan.blogspot.com

 

Persian Gulf Environmental Art Festival Second section


Environmental Art Festival on the Persian Gulf

 

Reaction to ignoring historic site

 

New Print on Sand in the Coast of Persian Gulf

 

New Carved Rocks in Hormoz Island (Persian Gulf)  March 2007

 

 

Works in USA

 

New works by Nadalian in “Verdearte” 2006:  Italy

 

Works in Iran

 

Works in UK

 

Works  in France

 

Works In Germany

 

Works  in Turkey

 

Print on Sand in the Coast of Persian Gulf Works By Ahmad Nadalian

 

Click Here to Download larger size Images

 

Utne Magazine May-June 2006  USA

Ahmad Nadalian
[Iran]

A human who loves stones and water, Ahmad Nadalian moves like a fish transgressing international borders.   More

 

Nadalian: River Art

An interview by John K. GRANDE

Nadalian is an Iranian sculptor whose life's work involves engendering respect for living creatures and the natural environment. To achieve this, besides living with nature himself, he established sculpture grounds in a peaceful environment in natural surroundings. Water is a living element that contributes to his sculptures, and many of the symbols he engraves and sculpts are derived from ancient mythology and the rituals of pre-Islamic civilizations. more

 

Nadalian in Green Museum

 

 

Works in Rock Creek River- Washington DC

 

Red People - Kansas City Missouri

 

Carved Stones in New York

 

Carved Stones in Santa Fe (New Mexico)

 

Environmental Works by  Ahmad Nadalian in UK

 

Freed Fish

 

New Borders

 

Seduced Couple

 

 

Freed Fish

 

New Borders

 

Seduced Couple

 

 

Freed Fish

 

New Borders

 

Seduced Couple

 

 

Freed Fish

 

New Borders

 

Seduced Couple

 

 

Freed Fish

 

New Borders

 

Seduced Couple

 

 

Freed Fish

 

New Borders

 

Seduced Couple

 

 

Freed Fish

 

New Borders

 

Seduced Couple

 

 

Freed Fish

 

New Borders

 

Seduced Couple

 

Freed Fish

 

New Borders

 

Seduced Couple

 

 

Freed Fish

 

New Borders

 

Seduced Couple

 

 

Freed Fish

 

New Borders

 

Seduced Couple

 

 

Freed Fish

 

New Borders

 

Seduced Couple

 

 

Freed Fish

 

New Borders

 

Seduced Couple

 

New Borders

 

Seduced Couple

 

 

Freed Fish

 

New Borders

 

Calendar of our journey in South Africa

 

Journey across South Africa: The Sprit of Rocks and Water

 

Sand Print in Africa

 

Freed Fish

 

Freed Fish

 

New Borders

 

Seduced Couple

 

Freed Fish

 

New Borders

 

Seduced Couple

 

 

Freed Fish

 

New Borders

 

Seduced Couple

 

 

Freed Fish

 

New Borders

 

Freed Fish

 

Black & White People

 

Sand Print in Africa

 

Freed Fish

 

Journey Touchpoints and estimated dates

Johannesburg

‘The area contains an exceptionally large and scientifically significant group of sites, which throw light on the earliest ancestors of humankind,’ stated the United Nations Education, Scientific and Cultural Organisation (UNESCO). ‘They constitute a vast reserve of scientific information, the potential of which is enormous.’

The Magaliesburg area probably has one of the most intriguing and longest session of history, as man would have experienced, than anywhere else on earth.

The reason for this is the discovery of the remains of the earliest species of primitive man know today, in and around the Sterkfontein Caves, some 20 minutes drive from Magaliesburg.

The tribes of the descendants of the earliest proto- hominids had free reign in this tranquil valley, and fished the clear streams, and hunted the vast herds of animals that roamed the plains, with is tools made initially from stone and later forged from iron. While his life may have been threatened by the odd wild animal, or early death from injury or disease, man lived in total harmony with nature, which flourished in abundance in the greater Magaliesburg area over the past two million years of his development.

Then, in what is very recent history, in the mid 1800’s, the savage feet of the great tribes of the north swept through the valley, bringing grief and a temporary tension to the once quiet paradise. The tribes moved on, and peace returned, but not for long, as war broke out again, when Mzilikazi’s impis attacked (generally after sunset), capturing the women and enslaving the men and young, to be incorporated into his army as warriors.

In the late 1800s the “white” tribes from the south arrived, they too seeking their piece of this paradise and with guns ablazing, they drove back the local tribes and hunted the herds of game daily, causing their numbers to dwindle rapidly.

Then on 1 October 1899, war between the two “White Tribes”, the British and the Boer Republics of Transvaal and Orange Free State, was declared. Within a year, blood and human lives were lost between these two warring parties, in the Magaliesberg valleys, at Kommando Nek, Nooitgedacht and in many of the deep gorges and high ridges along the mountain side.

And since the days when peace was declared the turn of the last century/ 1902, peace reigned once again in this garden of Eden, where for over the past several decades, man has lived in a peaceful co-existence with nature, farming the land and toiling with the historic truths of democracy.

Karoo- Philipolis

Philippolis is a quintessential town if ever there was one.  It has a rich history not only is it the oldest settlement in the Free state, having been established as a mission in 1823, it was also the centre of the old Griqua captaincies and was caught up in the cataclysmic events of the Boer War.

Proposed lecture and workshop: Future Nature School
Contact:Kate Grog

Amatoli mountains- Hogsback

This village, high up on the Amatola mountains and surrounded by centuries-old indigenous Afro-montane forests, has a dramatic natural beauty.

Garden route, Tsitsikama- Nature’s Valley

Natures Valley is flanked by an escarpment on the one and the Indian ocean on the other side and  forms part of the Tsitsikamma National Park. The Kouga, Kammanassie and "Groot Swart" mountain ranges stand guard over the valley

Possible contacts: Phyl Martin Park Botanical Garden
Kuland School

Garden route, Sedgefeild- Karatara

Africa's first FREE rural eco-business school for entrepreneurs.

The project's goal is to create wealth for Africa's rural communities in harmony with our environment. Karatara is a small Garden Route town, near Knysna, and the project's campus is called Eden Campus.

The students are Community Leaders, selected by their communities along the garden route to represent them in the project. Admission requirements centred mainly on the students’ aptitude, leadership abilities and commitment to taking what they learn back to their communities.

We provide learnerships into rural enterprise supported by advanced technologies, methodologies and alternative energy sources. A Business Degree will be available to those leaders with aspirations in the formal sector, academia or the will to excel academically prior to involving themselves in rural enterprise.

The syllabus is about 'Action Learning', which involves learning and immediately doing. We want our students to be in business way before they've qualified.

Proposed lecture: Eden Campus

Contact: Steve Calver

Western cape- De Hoop

De Hoop Nature Reserve is one of the Western Cape's best known Nature Reserves.

It lies on the southern Cape coast, and is renowned for its floral fynbos diversity, rich bird life, natural vlei and wild antelope. It also provides the backdrop to some of the world's best whale-watching possible.

Just 3 hours drive from Cape Town, and 50km east of Bredasdorp, it offers visitors the choice to explore a pristine coastline, a large vlei, limestone hills, extensive dunes and the Potberg mountains.

It is a botanist's dream, with 50 of its 1500 fynbos plant species found nowhere else in the world.

For animal lovers there are endangered bontebok and Cape mountain zebra, while baboons, ostriches, eland, grey rhebuck, duiker and steenbok are all common sights.

Known to amateur and working ornithologists alike, the De Hoop vlei is forever changing. A wetland recognised by the Ramsar convention as being of international importance, the vlei's uniqueness lies in its partial location in a gorge, while for the most it is a 16km-long lake, blocked off from the sea by coastal dunes.

It draws a variety of birds during the year, especially waterfowl and waders.

During scenic drives, visitors may leave their cars and walk anywhere in the reserve. Game viewing and birding is possible at every turn.

The area can also be explored on various day walks around the vlei, along the coast or at Potberg.

Or simply perch yourself next to the vlei for excellent birding, or relax on a dune to watch whales. More than 70 giants are regularly seen lazing just behind the breakers!

Biking is possible on most of the roads around the De Hoop side of the reserve, and no special permit is required.

The dunes at Koppie Alleen are reknowned for whalewatching.

De Hoop's marine reserve is the breeding ground for 40% of the worldwide population of Southern Right Whales. Dolphins, seals and other sea creatures abound in the waters at Koppie Alleen.

Namaqualand

Namaqualand is a semi-desert environment, however in the spring (July to September) depending on the rains, a miracle occurs. As the rains soak into the thirsty earth, millions upon millions of flowers emerge in a  phenomenal explosion of colour which transforms the landscape into a wonderland of beauty.

 Namaqualand stretches from the small town of Garies in the south to the Orange River to the north, its western border is the wild Atlantic coast, the remote town of Pofadder marks the eastern border.

 The Namaqualand spring flowers are justifiably world famous. In a good year this botanical masterpiece puts on a show that is unrivaled anywhere on Earth. If you experience this natural wonder you will remember it for the rest of your life.

 The Namaqua National Park has been established to protect this unique phenomenon. There is no official accommodation in the park, however there are many hotels, guest houses, B&Bs and camping sites available in and around the small towns that dot the vast landscape.

 

Freed Fish

 

Black & White People

 

Sand Print in Africa

 

Freed Fish

 

 

 

 

Journey across South Africa: The Sprit of Rocks and Water

 

Today is 26 September. I am flying in the sky and writing this note.  Many people like hearing stories, and many tell stories- I want to be the story. My art and life are the same,  my life is my art.

In the past 12 years, I’ve traveled to many lands and dedicated my fish to nature.  Canal of Venice, Rock Creek River- Washington DC, River Thames in London, Seine river in Paris, Lijiang River in China, Rhein River in Germany, Danube river in Serbia, … Persian Gulf, are now permanent hosts of the sprit of my fish.  

Now I also dedicated my fish to South Africa's rivers, Indian and Atlantic oceans.  These fish were born in the streams of my village and now they swim in the ocean of the global village. 

 

Africa from Sky

 

 

The story of my trip to South Africa began when Simon Max Bannister a young eco artist who lives in Johannesburg, sent an email at the beginning of this year to me. He found my website by chance and showed interest in my “River Art” project. A month ago I sent an email to him saying that I would like to visit South Africa. He insisted that I must come and would be my guide, and so the journey begins…

 

 

I am very happy that I have traveled to the most southern region of in South Africa. I arrived in Johannesburg on September 9.  In the airport I saw Max who depicted fish on a black board and welcomed me.  I was proud to see someone in another part of the world demanding and supporting my art. 

 

 

 

Simon Max Bannister in the airport of Johannesburg

 

For me it was important to make this trip, because the first time I received my passport, because of the domination of the Apartheid regime, I wasn’t allowed to travel there. Now I am happy to make this journey and my fish will stay there forever. With this trip the map of my works can be seen like a cross across the world.

 

 

I traveled to the most western part of USA. When I was there I had a feeling. It was one of the furthest places I could go from my home. When I called my family I noticed that the time in Tehran is 12 hours ahead. So when I was in Seattle I was one day younger.

When I traveled to the most eastern part of china I felt that the time had past and I was experiencing a future life.  In the most northern part of the world, summer seemed like winter and at midnight I could see a light in the late afternoon of my homeland.

 

 

In South Africa I enjoyed spring in autumn. In Iran we start our new year in the first day of spring and I am happy that on the 22 of September I was in Cape Town and saw blossoming trees and spring flowers. So this year I experienced two New Years. We are living in an amazing world! Our ancestors didn’t experience these facts.

 

It was a fantastic journey.  Simon Max Banister planed the trip, and for the whole journey we were together, and in many cases the outcomes were collaborative works.  During this journey he also used colored earth and soft rock to paint on other rocks. And on some occasions he added colour to my carvings.

 

 

 

Max usually makes sculptures with collected waste materials, creates a junk sculpture and replaces them back in nature. This is part of an initiative called “re”. It asks you to rethink, reflect, reconnect, recreate and react ( you can find out more on his website www.re.org.za).

 

 

 

 

During my journeys across the globe I tried to see cultural, social and political environments in relation to nature.

 

 

In South Africa I saw a society that shows a mixture of Africa and the West. I felt still after many years that the dominating effects of Apartheid are not over; there is distance and gap between poor and the rich, black and white.

 

 

Kate Grogh and Children

 

I am not black, nor white, perhaps something in between. Having this color, I also met many respected people, mostly white, who try to bring equality. They do their best to educate the society whose majority is black. 

 

We shouldn’t forget that regardless of races or richness or poorness, now we face with global social, political and of course ecological crises.

 

 

 

 

Our children, like my little fish cannot survive in a polluted environment.

 

 

 

 

We must help them to exist.

 

 

This is a duty where there are many hands that need to touch.

 

 

The pattern on the skin of a zebra inspired me to realize a project named “black and white”, where I paint with white color on black skin and black color on white skin to make them similar.

 

 

This can also affect the life of other creatures.

 

Through interaction and collaboration we may be able to build a better environment for us, other creatures, and of course the next generation.

 

 

Works In  South Africa

 

In Africa I created a diversity of works, including carved stones on riverbeds, rocks on beaches and rocks in mountains. 

 

My works at Magaliesburg Mountain

 

During our journeys we saw many animals; some of them affected my works. I carved antelope that is similar to Ibex.  I then used my images of giraffes to make carvings in two locations. 

 

 

 

 

South Africa, like Iran is a colorful land. In different places I could find rocks and stone with different colors.

 

 

 

 

As a personal ritual a carved many fish on stones and dropped them into the ocean and rivers.

 

 

 

 

 

 

But the most unusual and amazing was a small river with red water. With time, the plants by river make it red.

 

 

When I dropped my fish into this river the colors of the splash were very interesting. It was like a dream to see the fish under the red water with a yellow wand in the background, and occasionally the reflection of blue sky.

 

 

I used my new cylinder seals and printed them on the sands of the beaches. 

 

 

 

One of the new cylinders shows starfish. It was my desire to reflect the stars of heaven in earth and remind that in the ocean there are millions of beautiful creatures.

 

 

One of the new cylinders shows a modified symbol to recycle. Max created this sign, when I was in Iran; he sent me the image via e-mail.

 

 

I also painted the faces of people. The snake is now my favorite pattern.  It is a symbol of eternity and treasure.

 

Eve & Pineapple

 

It is also an astronomical sign and related to the story of Eve and Adam in paradise. It is also an astronomical sign and related to the story of Eve and Adam in paradise.

 

 

 

 

Another new experience for me was to use colored earth on the body of a Whale shark. I paint a three-headed snake on the body of shark. 

 

 

 

A three headed snake for Persian is a dragon and related to dualistic religion of Zoroastrian. It was symbol of evil. At a later Islamic period, a famous Persian poet converted this evil power to an evil king who had two snakes on his shoulder. In a way within Islamic monotheism, old mythology survived as now Persians read it.  Furthermore, Moslem mystics interpreted a dragon or any evil symbols such as divas, as our deeds and carnal soul.

 

 

Like many times before, I waited to document the process of how with the tide, when the water rises, my work vanishes with the waves.

 

 

 

Max and I arranged a workshop and created a collaborative work with some African children. We encouraged them to collect waste material and to create music with these items, a magical way to recreate new life with discarded objects. Max encourages them to paint with chalk on the rocks, and so they made an environmental installation. We enjoyed their creativity and dance. It was a great day.

 

 

At Eden campus I used a video projection and design of a shell spiral on the face of Max. He usually likes archetypal symbols such as spiral or circle. 

 

 

 

 

I also extended my project named border, which started in Serbia.

 

 

 

Max says as a South African, he has European heritage in the family.  So having this background, one can question, which culture is he? The same question can be raised for larger communities that include people from many nationalities, do we shape our borders or do borders shape us?  The concept behind this project is that we live within the racial, geographical, political, social and cultural borders. Despite all political conflicts, in comparison to past times, now people are more mobile and so, more mixed cultures will be born. 

During this journey I realized more that despite being in very remote regions in the world now via new technology we meet virtually with our friends and family to interact.

 

 

Max could see and talk with his girlfriend and I could see and exchange words with my family. These new possibilities make the trips possible and easier.

 

 

I owe more than thanks to Max and his family who were very kind to me as they deeply respected what I am doing.  I was astonished and surprised for their gentleness, admiration and generosity. 

 

 

They provided my accommodation in Johannesburg and Cape Town and in other locations I stayed in the homes of their friends and camped thanks to the planning of Max. We cooked ourselves and washed the dishes! In Iran the door of my Paradise-garden and family house is open to many young artists who come there and stay to work. This kindness of Max's family is a rewarding of my deeds.

 

 

Max chose the best people, environments and locations for my projects and drove more than two thousands five hundred kilometers to show me these people and places. Without his willingness it was impossible to realize these works.

 

 

 

 

I left two of my fish at their villa in Cape Town to say thanks to Max's family. One was presented in the building and the other installed in a stream, which passes through their garden. And on the morning of my departure 26th  September I dedicated the cylinder with the recycle symbol to Max to say thanks for everything. 

 

 

 

Max Says: The journey has been a success in all. Ahmad’s mission to spread his fish around the four corners of the Earth is complete. He has left many an everlasting moment in his works around South Africa. I feel he has seen both sides of the communities, from the rich to the poor, city to wilderness, from the ugly to the beautiful. We have touched many people’s lives too and left a strong positive message along the way. Ahmad has been a complete inspiration; I have a resurgence of energy to focus supremely on my art and its message. He has shown me focus and a daring determination in what is his passion and life.

 


 

Rock and River Spirit journey - Art and the environment

For this report, which describes our trip in more detail, I used Max’s calendar of our journey.

I arrived in Johannesburg on September 9.  In the airport I saw Max who depicted fish on a black board and welcomed me.   I stayed in Max's family house and we had a wonderful dinner with his family, Adam, Paul and Alison Bannister. After resting for the night, on September 10 we visited, Johannesburg City: we walk alongside a local market in Alexander Township. I noticed that they sold pieces of earth. I discovered that women, who are pregnant, traditionally eat these pieces of earth. This indicated a link between being a mother and earth.  Then we visited University of Witwatersrand- Origins Centre. In the museum I saw many example of South African prehistoric and primitive art. The Khoisan paintings and especially the symbolic carvings on riverbeds fascinated us. After that we visited Ingrid Gruin and Chatillon’ s house and garden- were told about spirit rocks by Credo Mutwa. Ingrid Gruin offered a gift to me. A book named Adam's Calendar.  After lunch we went to a river named Braamfontein Spruit. I carved my first fish by the river, which passes through the city.  Then we left Johannesburg and to Magaliesburg- the cradle of human kind- arriving in the afternoon we settled down and watched the stars…  Awoke with first light and packed up. Max and I then headed out towards the rocks! I made carvings on the rocks. They showed an animal totem, which is a solar symbol and an antelope. Max started drawings in the sand. His works mostly show symbols related to life and eternity.  In Magaliesburg I also carved some fish along the river. The last piece was a Goddess of fertility on a large scale laying down catching the sun with a fish on her head. The fish symbolize fertility, the Goddess, the virgin; waiting to become impregnated by the water and so would bring the coming of a new spiritual leader.  More Images

 

 

 

After that we drove over the Magalies pass and headed out to Parys- After a long drive with a beautiful sunset over the Klein Karoo, we arrived in the extremely quiet town of Philipolis.  Kate Grogh greeted us warmly and gave us dinner, after which we found comfort in one of the Starry room houses and recharged...   After being introduced to the community by Kate Grogh of Future Nature we found a location to practice for a workshop. The workshop included the collection of waste items, taking them to the prepared location at the top of a nearby koppie. The Children were then asked to make music with what they had collected.  I chose some of them and painted their faces. In the meantime the rest were given chalk and asked to draw particular iconic shapes on the rocks around the location, such as snakes, suns and stars. This was then followed by the construction of a “rock snake”. Thereafter we made more music with more singing and dancing as the sun went down. After descending the koppie (top of hill) we made a fire, and made more music.  The day after we went to Hogsback. We arrived in at midday, and found the location at the bottom pool by the Mother and child waterfall.   We both then got to work… I first carved a fish onto a rock, which I then threw into the pool. Then I chose a large rock facing the waterfall and carved a mother and child image, this was a “ mirror of a mirror”. More Images

 

 

 

My fish at the Great fish river

 

Max drew on many of the rocks with charcoal and the local soft ochre rocks, he drew many symbols, a “flower of life”, a snake, a fish, and a flame on wood, bubbles and covered a rock with lines to signify “fences in nature”. We both then took many photographs of the work, the waterfall and a rainbow that caught the setting sun.   On the 14th  of September we went to the Garden route- Nature’s Valley and were welcomed by Tasha Weddapohl of the Katumba community.  The day after we got up early to catch sunrise on the beach. I use my cylinders seal and printed fish, starfish and a sign of recycle on the sand of the beach.  More Images

 

 

 

 

We then walked to the river mouth along the cliffs, where we found a stranded dead whale shark that must have been trapped the night before.

 

 

I use colored earth and decided to create my own “mythological creature” and proceeded to paint a three-headed snake on the body of the shark. More Images

 

 

 

Max drew on many rocks, using the natural patterns of shells as inspiration. At the end of the day Max and Tash constructed an "anarchy pyramid" to celebrate the end of the day and for the coming storm.  The day after on the16th September in the morning I painted Tash's face with red earth, and took photographs of her with a pineapple. We then headed to Knysna, went to the beach at the heads. I did fish carvings, while Max collected waste and focused on the “recreation” process. We after that, we drove to Eden Campus, Karatara, and were shown around the campus. We then drove to Willow point in Sedgefield to stay in a rondavel hut.  On the 17th  September we went to visit Eden Campus and I had a lecture and presented my article titled Art and Environment.  On the 18th  September from Willow point we drove to the beach near Witsand. We were met by rain, however went to the beach and saw three humpback whales. The day after, we went to the beach early to catch the sunrise. After waiting for the sun to come over a cloud, we were happy for its warmth as it lit the whole beach in yellow light. We then walked along the beach finding locations for artworks. The tide was low and I found a beautiful pool by the beach, which I then proceeded to populate with my fish. I carved a snake, which Max coloured with bright red earth. Max drew on many stones, following natural shapes and contours.  More Images

 

 

On the tides return we took photographs of our work being covered by the ocean. We then walked into the sand dunes to get a good perspective of the huge beach.   More

 

 

I also hid one my fish in the sand near a tree and printed a snake on the sand.

 

 

 

On the 20th  September we drove to the most Southern point in Africa at Cape Aghulus. We walked down to the furthest rocks and got to work.

 

We worked on many pieces, the highlight being the throwing of a fish into another rock-pool- we managed to catch the splash of the fish. After this we then decided to get to Cape Town.

 

 

We drove past Muizenburg beach and saw that the water was a brown colour.  We presumed it was caused by some pollution.  More Images

 

 

We did some cylinder rolls that looked dramatic with the coloured water. Later that night we went to Cape Town to catch some nightlife, which we found on Long Street. A new band called “When John met Wendy” had their debut gig, which was nice different music and interesting crowd.

In Cape Town one day we went for a walk up the mountain near Kalk Bay. What was interesting for me was the red colour of water caused by the mineral deposits of the local Fynbos.  More Images

 

 

We explored a deep cave and we each made a carving by candlelight. We then descended just in time for nightfall.   

 

 

 

On the 22nd  September  we went to University of Cape Town (UCT) looking for the art Faculty. We found that it was on a different campus in Cape Town itself. So we went and made an appointment to see Kurt Campbell the next day at UCT Michaelis School of fine art. Then we then met Max’s friend, Damon Cullinan and he took us to a stream flowing from Table Mountain and I carved two hands on the black slate rock.  More Images

 

 

In 24th  September we then drove into the Redhill Settlement Village. We approached a group sitting round a fire. One of the women had orange ochre on her face, I questioned her what it was and they showed us the local clay rock. A man then decided to crush some with water and paint his face to demonstrate; he then painted my face too.

 

This was quite amusing for the people watching and so we seemed to be welcomed by the community. We then ventured deeper into the village, were welcomed to see inside some people’s shacks (houses). We met a young man by the name of Steven and asked if he would like to be part of the Zebra hand project.  Max drew with charcoal and rock on some of the rusted corrugated iron, while I carved giraffes into a large rock.   More Images

 

 

 

On the way back I propose about establishing an environmental art center in South Africa. To transform waste to art, this has a strong message that speaks for the preservation of the environment. We also discussed how an art house/ gallery could be made in a local village and serve to uplift the community financially, mentally and environmentally.

25th  September was the last day that I stayed in Cape Town.  We went for a walk back up the mountain and found a stream with red water. We were both very interested in the water colour as it is very unusual and creates interesting settings for artworks. I took many photographs and did many fish rock water splashes. More Images

 

 

Max set about making a frog from waste that he collected on the walk. Once complete he set it in stream and took photographs. I then left one of my pre-carved fish in the stream.

I then carved two footraces on a red rock on the pathway. Then near the bottom of the trail I did another giraffe. He made a bird ...  More Images

 

 

 

 

Max fashioned a crow from the rest of the waste that he found. Throwing into into the sky, catching it “mid flight”.  More Images

 

 

 

We then went back to Simons Town where I placed his remaining carved fish in the stream of Max's parent’s garden.

In the 26 September I flew back to Johannesburg and from there, to Dubai. I will then fly back to my home in the mountains of Tehran in Iran.  More Images